History (MA)

History (MA)

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The Department of History offers courses leading to the Master of Arts (MA) in History and the Master of Arts in Interdisciplinary studies with a Concentration in History. Our graduate faculty has expertise in a variety of geographical and thematic areas. Students pursuing the MA in History may focus on one of several specializations that include American, Borderlands, World (Middle East, Asia, and Europe), Atlantic World, Race & Ethnicity, Women & Gender, Labor, Latin America, and Religion and Military History.

Why UTRGV?

  • Ranked #79 among 300+ national universities by Washington Monthly in 2018
  • Accredited, cutting edge degree program
  • Experienced, dedicated faculty
  • Affordable tuition (ranked #1 in net price among national universities by Washington Monthly in 2018 and #3 most affordable university in America 2018 by BestValueSchools.com)
  • Demonstrated student success in research, professional certification and career advancement

Admission Requirements

Step #1: Submit a UTRGV Graduate Application at www.utrgv.edu/gradapply. There is no application fee.

Step #2: Request your official transcripts to be sent electronically to gradapps@utrgv.edu or mailed to:

The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley
The Graduate College
Marialice Shary Shivers Bldg. 1.158
1201 W. University Drive
Edinburg, TX 78539-2999

 
*Please Note: If you are a graduate of UTPA, UTB/TSC, or UTRGV you do not need to request an official transcript to be sent to the Graduate College.

Review and submit all Program Requirements:

  • Bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited institution in the United States or a recognized international equivalent in a similar or related field.
  • Undergraduate GPA of at least 3.0.
  • Official transcripts from each institution attended (must be submitted directly to UTRGV).
  • Minimum of 12 hours of upper division and 9 hours of lower division History coursework.
  • Personal  statement  detailing  professional  goals  and  reasons  for pursuing the graduate degree.
  • Two  letters  of  recommendation  from  professional  or  academic sources.
  • GRE General Test. GRE test scores are valid for 5 years. A waiver of the GRE requirement will be granted to applicants who show proof of completing a graduate degree (master’s or doctoral).
  • Writing sample of at least 5 pages with citations and bibliography.

Additional requirements for domestic applicants who attended foreign universities:

  • TOEFL or IELTS Language Proficiency Test with minimum scores: 550 on paper-based, 213 on computer based, or 79 on Internet-based for the TOEFL; 6.5 for the IELTS. TOEFL and IELTS scores are valid for 2 years. For additional information, visit the Additional Documents for Domestic Applicants who Attend Foreign Universities section of our website.
  • Certified English translation of educational records.

Additional requirements for international applicants:

  • TOEFL or IELTS Language Proficiency Test with minimum scores: 550 on paper-based, 213 on computer based, or 79 on Internet-based for the TOEFL; 6.5 for the IELTS. For additional information, visit the English Proficiency Exam section of our website.
  • Certified English translation of educational records.
  • Financial   Documentation  showing sufficient funds to cover all expenses (living and academic) for the first year of study. For additional information, visit the Financial Documentation section of our website.
  • Immigration  documents, including a current copy of your valid passport. For additional information, visit the Immigration Documents section of our website.

UPDATE ON INTERNATIONAL ADMISSIONS FROM U.S. IMMIGRATION AND CUSTOMS ENFORCEMENT:

  • SEVP regulations prohibit the issuance of a Form I-20 based on conditional admission, effective July 13, 2016. University officials can only issue a Form I-20 when students have met all standards for admission for the program of study listed on the Form I-20. These standards for admission include any English proficiency requirements.

Program Contact

Program Coordinator: Dr. Jamie Starling

Phone: (956) 665-8797

Office: Edinburg Campus, ELABS 356

E-Mail: jamie.starling@utrgv.edu 

Deadlines

Deadlines:

Applications will be accepted year round and prospective students are encouraged to apply at least 2 months before classes start to ensure a timely application review.  Applying early will also give prospective students the best opportunity to be considered for scholarships and other possible funding opportunities.

*Note: This program only admits applicants during Fall, Spring, Summer I and Summer II semesters.

Tuition Estimate

Residency Per 3-Credit Hour Course Semester (9-Credit Hours) Total Estimated Cost
Texas Resident $1,481.39 $3,894.17 $17,776.68
Non-Resident/International $2,708.39 $7,575.17 $32,500.68


*We estimate that tuition and fees will closely approximate the rates shown above; however, rates are subject to change. Please note that the rates above are estimated for on-campus students and those enrolled in 16-week online programs. The rate is different for Accelerated Online Programs (AOP). Visit the tuition and fees page for detailed information.

Course Requirements

Required Courses 3
HIST 6300: Historiography and Methods 3
 
Choose one of the following options:
 
Thesis Option:
History Courses 21
History courses at the 5000 and 6000 level, 3 hours of which must be at the 6000 level
 
Free Electives 6
May be chosen from one or two outside fields
 
Capstone Requirement 6
Thesis
HIST 7300: Thesis I 3
HIST 7301: Thesis II 3
 
Total graduate hours for degree: 36
 
Non‐Thesis Option:
History Courses 27
History courses at the 5000 and 6000 level, 3 hours of which must be at the 6000 level
 
Free Electives 6
May be chosen from one or two outside fields
 
Capstone Requirement
Written Comprehensive Exams
 
Total graduate hours for degree: 36
 

Course Descriptions

HIST 5300: Readings in U.S. History prior to 1877               [3‐0]

A directed study of selected topics in U.S. history. Topics are varied according to availability of faculty and student interest. Course can be repeated as topic changes.

HIST 5305: Readings in U.S. History after 1877              [3‐0]

A readings and historiographic course based on topics from the post Reconstruction period of U.S. History. Course can be repeated as topic changes.

HIST 5310: Readings of the History of the West              [3‐0]

The course analyzes the history of the American West and Frontier from the Appalachian Range to the Pacific Ocean with a special emphasis on the West as a distinctive region in the United States. Course can be repeated as topic changes.

HIST 5315: Readings in U.S. History Special Topics              [3‐0]

This course may be a topical or thematic readings course based on instructor design, covering a specific issue in U.S. History. Course can be repeated as topic changes.

HIST 5320: Readings in Medieval/Early Modern European History              [3‐0]

A directed study of selected topics in European history. Topics are varied according to availability of faculty and student interest. Course can be repeated as topic changes.

HIST 5325: Readings in Modern European History              [3‐0]

This course explores European history since 1789, examining key themes and issues such as the rise of industrialization, the development of the modern economic world system, the interlocking developments of the nation state, imperialism, World Wars I and II, genocide, post war reconstruction and the Cold War. Course can be repeated as topic changes.

HIST 5330: Readings in European History – Special Topics              [3‐0]

This course explores selected topics in European History. Specific topics, including regions and periods, vary according to the availability and the research interests of faculty. Course can be repeated as topic changes.

HIST 5340: Readings in Latin American History              [3‐0]

A directed study of selected topics in Latin American history. Topics are varied according to availability of faculty and student interest. Course can be repeated as topic changes.

HIST 5345: Readings in Borderlands History               [3‐0]

A directed study of selected topics in Borderlands history. Topics are varied according to availability of faculty and student interest. Course can be repeated as topic changes.

HIST 5350: Readings in Texas/Southwest History               [3‐0]

An intensive investigation of selected problems in southwestern history with emphasis on Texas. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Course can be repeated as topic changes.

HIST 5355: Readings in Mexican American History              [3‐0]

A course examining selected elements of Mexican American History with topics and time periods varying according to faculty interests. Course can be repeated as topic changes.

HIST 5360: Readings in World History              [3‐0]

The course examines selected topics in World History. Specific topics, including regions and periods, vary according to the availability and the research interests of faculty. Course can be repeated as topic changes.

HIST 5365: Readings in Comparative History              [3‐0]

A directed study of selected topics treated in comparative or transnational perspective, including such topics as development and underdevelopment, regional interaction, the status of women, cultural exchanges, immigration and social change. Topics are varied according to availability of faculty and student interest. Course can be repeated as topic changes.

HIST 5370: Readings in Women’s History              [3‐0]

The course analyzes the roles of women in history, including their contributions to the development of the family, the economy, politics, warfare, urbanization, and recreation, among many others. Specific topics, including regions and periods, vary according to the availability and the research interests of faculty. Course can be repeated as topic changes.

HIST 5375: Readings in Race/Ethnicity               [3‐0]

This course analyzes the history of race and ethnicity as concepts in the American context, exploring how they persisted and evolved from the late eighteenth to the late twentieth century. Its focus is on the ways that Americans have actively constructed and reconstructed race and ethnicity through discourse, legislation, residential patterns, and violence, among others. Course can be repeated as topic changes.

HIST 5390: Readings – Special Topics              [3‐0]

This course will explore through selected readings some specifically defined historical theme, issue, place, or period. Its emphasis varies according to the availability and the research interests of faculty. Course can be repeated as topic changes.

HIST 5395: Readings in Research Related Historiography              [3‐0]

An independently arranged readings class to prepare students to research and write a thesis, conference paper, or other full length project.

HIST 6300: Historiography and Methods              [3‐0]

A description of the chief source materials of history and bibliography; methods of the aids in historical research; and explanations of generally accepted usages in historical composition. (This course is required of all graduate students majoring and minoring in history and should be taken at the start of the graduate program).

HIST 6305: Research Seminar U.S. History prior to 1877              [3‐0]

A survey and critique of the bibliography and problems of various eras in American history before the Civil War. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

HIST 6310: Research Seminar U.S. History after 1877               [3‐0]

A survey and critique of the bibliography and problems of various eras in American history since 1860. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

HIST 6315: Research Seminar European History              [3‐0]

A survey and critique of the bibliography associated with investigations of selected era studies and problems experienced by modern Europe. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

HIST 6320: Research Seminar World History              [3‐0]

This course investigates significant issues and themes in European or World History since 1650. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

HIST 6325: Research Seminar Borderlands History              [3‐0]

This course introduces students to major themes and topics of the history and historiography of the Mexican‐American borderlands. Emphasis will be put on the economy, immigration, culture and society. Course can be repeated as topic changes.

HIST 6330: Research Seminar in Latin American History              [3‐0]

A survey and critique of the bibliography and problems of various eras in Latin American history. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

HIST 6335: Research Seminar – Special Topics              [3‐0]

This course will explore some specifically defined historical theme, issue, place, or period. In addition to participating in weekly discussions of course readings, students will produce, in consultation with the supervising faculty member, their own original research paper. Course can be repeated as topic changes.

HIST 6340: Research Seminar in Mexican American History               [3‐0]

A course directing students in primary source research on selected topics in the field of Mexican American history. Course can be repeated as topic changes.

HIST 6396: Research Practicum              [3‐0]

This course provides students with practical research experience under the supervision of a graduate faculty member. Faculty will work with students to develop bibliographies, gather and organize data, review primary sources, and check citations.

HIST 7300: Thesis I              [3‐0]

Research and writing of the thesis.

HIST 7301: Thesis II              [3‐0]

Research and writing of the thesis.

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