Mechanical Engineering (MSE)

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The Master of Science in Engineering: Mechanical Engineering degree has a thesis option, a non-thesis option, and a project with report option. Coursework is offered in areas including Mechanics and Design, Materials, and Thermal- fluid Sciences. Potential research opportunities exist in combustion, nanotechnology, MEMS and NEMS, smart structures, biomechanics, biomaterials, robotics, mechatronics, acoustics and vibrations, materials science, materials engineering, solid mechanics, experimental heat transfer and fluid mechanics, thermal and dynamic testing and analysis of railroad rolling stock, and bearing condition monitoring.

  • Why UTRGV?

    • Ranked #79 among 300+ national universities by Washington Monthly in 2018
    • Accredited, cutting edge degree program
    • Experienced, dedicated faculty
    • Affordable tuition (ranked #1 in net price among natinal universities by Washington Monthly in 2018 and #3 most affordable university in America 2018 by BestValueSchools.com)
    • Demonstrated student success in research, professional certification and career advancement
  • Admission Requirements

    Step #1: Submit a UTRGV Graduate Application at www.utrgv.edu/gradapply.  The university application fee of $50 ($100 for International Applicants) can be paid online by credit card or electronic check (in the online application). All application fees are nonrefundable.

    Step #2: Request your official transcripts to be sent electronically to gradapps@utrgv.edu or mailed to:

    The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley
    The Graduate College
    Marialice Shary Shivers Bldg. 1.158
    1201 W. University Drive
    Edinburg, TX 78539-2999

     
    *Please Note: If you are a graduate of UTPA, UTB/TSC, or UTRGV you do not need to request an official transcript to be sent to the Graduate College.

    Review and submit all Program Requirements:

    • Bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering or a Bachelor’s degree in another field with courses and/or experience that prepare the applicant for graduate work in Mechanical Engineering or Materials Science Engineering, depending upon the track the student opts to follow.
    • Undergraduate GPA of at least 3.0.
    • Official transcripts from each institution attended (must be submitted directly to UTRGV).
    • Three letters of recommendation from professional or academic sources.
    • Letter of Intent detailing professional goals and reasons for pursuing the graduate degree.
    • Resume.
    • GRE General Test. GRE test scores are valid for 5 years. A waiver of the GRE requirement will be granted to applicants who show proof of completing a graduate degree (master’s or doctoral).

    Additional requirements for domestic applicants who attended foreign universities:

    • TOEFL or IELTS Language Proficiency Test with minimum scores: 550 on paper-based, 213 on computer based, or 79 on internet-based for the TOEFL; 6.5 for the IELTS. TOEFL and IELTS scores are valid for 2 years. For additional information, visit the Additional Documents for Domestic Applicants who Attend Foreign Universities section of our website.
    • Certified English translation of educational records.

    Additional requirements for international applicants:

    • TOEFL or IELTS Language Proficiency Test with minimum scores: 550 on paper-based, 213 on computer based, or 79 on internet-based for the TOEFL; 6.5 for the IELTS. For additional information, visit the English Proficiency Exam section of our website.
    • Certified English translation of educational records.
    • Financial   Documentation  showing sufficient funds to cover all expenses (living and academic) for the first year of study. For additional information, visit the Financial Documentation section of our website.
    • Immigration  documents, including a current copy of your valid passport. For additional information, visit the Immigration Documents section of our website.

    UPDATE ON INTERNATIONAL ADMISSIONS FROM U.S. IMMIGRATION AND CUSTOMS ENFORCEMENT:

    • SEVP regulations prohibit the issuance of a Form I-20 based on conditional admission, effective July 13, 2016. University officials can only issue a Form I-20 when students have met all standards for admission for the program of study listed on the Form I-20. These standards for admission include any English proficiency requirements.

  • Program Contact

    Program Coordinator: Dr. Horacio Vasquez

    Phone: (956) 665-7419

    Office: Edinburg Campus, EENGR 3260

    E-Mail: Horacio.vasquez@utrgv.edu 

  • Deadlines

    Deadlines:

    Applications will be accepted year round and prospective students are encouraged to apply at least 2 months before classes start to ensure a timely application review.  Applying early will also give prospective students the best opportunity to be considered for scholarships and other possible funding opportunities.

    *Note: This program only admits applicants during Fall, Spring, Summer I and Summer II semesters.

  • Course Requirements

    General Concentration
     
    Required Courses 12
    MECE 6310: Intermediate Engineering Analysis 3
    MECE 6320: Fracture Mechanics 3
    MECE 6341: Modeling of Physical Systems 3
    MECE 6372: Viscous Flow I 3
     
    Choose one of the following options:
     
    Thesis Option:
    Designated Electives (6 hours must be in Mechanical Engineering) 6-12
    MECE 6190: Engineering Seminar 1
    MECE 6316: Advanced Materials Engineering 3
    MECE 6317: Corrosion Engineering 3
    MECE 6318: Intermediate Biomaterials 3
    MECE 6319: Thin Films Surface Engineering 3
    MECE 6321: Intermediate Composite Material Design 3
    MECE 6322: Ceramic Materials Engineering 3
    MECE 6323: Polymer Processing 3
    MECE 6324: Viscoelasticity Theory 3
    MECE 6325: Composite Structures Engineering 3
    MECE 6327: Intermediate Nanotechnology 3
    MECE 6328: Spectroscopic Techniques 3
    MECE 6331: Intermediate Dynamics of Mechanical Systems 3
    MECE 6332: Intermediate Mechanical Vibrations 3
    MECE 6333: Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos 3
    MECE 6334: Modeling MEMS and NEMS 3
    MECE 6335: Orthopedic Biomechanics 3
    MECE 6342: Modern Control Systems 3
    MECE 6344: Nonlinear Control Systems 3
    MECE 6360: Advanced Mechanics of Materials 3
    MECE 6362: Finite Element Analysis 3
    MECE 6373: Viscous Flow II 3
    MECE 6375: Engineering Acoustics 3
    MECE 6379: Gas Dynamics 3
    MECE 6380: Combustion Engineering 3
    MECE 6384: HVAC System Design 3
    MECE 6385: Thermal Systems 3
    MECE 6399: Topics in Mechanical Engineering 3
     
    Free Electives 0-6
    Students can select up to 6 credit hours of graduate coursework from any of the other departments within the College of Engineering and Computer Science but MUST have the written consent of the Graduate Program Director.
     
    Capstone Requirement
    Thesis 6
    MECE 7300: Thesis I 3
    MECE 7301: Thesis II 3
    Students in this option MUST produce a written thesis in a relevant Mechanical Engineering topic of study and defend their thesis in front of their formed Thesis Committee.
     
    Total graduate hours for degree: 30
     
    Non-Thesis Option:
    Designated Electives (18 hours must be in Mechanical Engineering) 18-24
    Chosen from the following:
    MECE 6190: Engineering Seminar 1
    MECE 6316: Advanced Materials Engineering 3
    MECE 6317: Corrosion Engineering 3
    MECE 6318: Intermediate Biomaterials 3
    MECE 6319: Thin Films Surface Engineering 3
    MECE 6321: Intermediate Composite Material Design 3
    MECE 6322: Ceramic Materials Engineering 3
    MECE 6323: Polymer Processing 3
    MECE 6324: Viscoelasticity Theory 3
    MECE 6325: Composite Structures Engineering 3
    MECE 6327: Intermediate Nanotechnology 3
    MECE 6328: Spectroscopic Techniques 3
    MECE 6331: Intermediate Dynamics of Mechanical Systems 3
    MECE 6332: Intermediate Mechanical Vibrations 3
    MECE 6333: Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos 3
    MECE 6334: Modeling MEMS and NEMS 3
    MECE 6335: Orthopedic Biomechanics 3
    MECE 6342: Modern Control Systems 3
    MECE 6343: Digital Control Systems 3
    MECE 6344: Nonlinear Control Systems 3
    MECE 6360: Advanced Mechanics of Materials 3
    MECE 6362: Finite Element Analysis 3
    MECE 6373: Viscous Flow II 3
    MECE 6375: Engineering Acoustics 3
    MECE 6379: Gas Dynamics 3
    MECE 6380: Combustion Engineering 3
    MECE 6384: HVAC System Design 3
    MECE 6385: Thermal Systems 3
    MECE 6399: Topics in Mechanical Engineering 3
     
    Free Electives 0-6
    Students can select up to 6 credit hours of graduate coursework from any of the other departments within the College of Engineering and Computer Science but MUST have the written consent of the Graduate Program Director.
     
    Capstone Requirement
    Oral Comprehensive Exam (administered as part of MECE 6190 Engineering Seminar Course) Written Comprehensive Exam (students MUST successfully pass a written exam in each one of the four required (core) courses with a grade of >70%.
     
    Total graduate hours for degree: 36
     
    Materials Concentration
     
    Required Courses 12
    MECE 6310: Intermediate Engineering Analysis 3
    MECE 6316: Advanced Materials Engineering 3
    MECE 6320: Fracture Mechanics 3
    MECE 6327: Intermediate Nanotechnology 3
     
    Choose one of the following options:
     
    Thesis Option:
    Designated Electives (6 hours must be in Mechanical Engineering) 6-12
    Chosen from the following:
    MECE 6190: Engineering Seminar 1
    MECE 6317: Corrosion Engineering 3
    MECE 6318: Intermediate Biomaterials 3
    MECE 6319: Thin Films Surface Engineering 3
    MECE 6321: Intermediate Composite Material Design 3
    MECE 6322: Ceramic Materials Engineering 3
    MECE 6323: Polymer Processing 3
    MECE 6324: Viscoelasticity Theory 3
    MECE 6325: Composite Structures Engineering 3
    MECE 6326: Polymer Engineering 3
    MECE 6328: Spectroscopic Techniques 3
    MECE 6360: Advanced Mechanics of Materials 3
    MECE 6362: Finite Element Analysis 3
    MECE 6399: Topics in Mechanical Engineering 3
     
    Free Electives 0-6
    Students can select up to 6 credit hours of graduate coursework from any of the other departments within the College of Engineering and Computer Science but MUST have the written consent of the Graduate Program Director.
     
    Capstone Requirement
    Thesis 6
    MECE 7300: Thesis I 3
    MECE 7301: Thesis II 3
    Students in this option MUST produce a written thesis in a relevant Mechanical Engineering topic of study and defend their thesis in front of their formed Thesis Committee.
     
    Total graduate hours for degree: 30
     
    Non-Thesis Option:
    Designated Electives (18 hours must be in Mechanical Engineering) 18-24
    Chosen from the following:
    MECE 6190: Engineering Seminar 1
    MECE 6317: Corrosion Engineering 3
    MECE 6318: Intermediate Biomaterials 3
    MECE 6319: Thin Films Surface Engineering 3
    MECE 6321: Intermediate Composite Material Design 3
    MECE 6322: Ceramic Materials Engineering 3
    MECE 6323: Polymer Processing 3
    MECE 6324: Viscoelasticity Theory 3
    MECE 6325: Composite Structures Engineering 3
    MECE 6326: Polymer Engineering 3
    MECE 6328: Spectroscopic Techniques 3
    MECE 6360: Advanced Mechanics of Materials 3
    MECE 6362: Finite Element Analysis 3
    MECE 6399: Topics in Mechanical Engineering 3
     
    Free Electives 0-6
    Students can select up to 6 credit hours of graduate coursework from any of the other departments within the College of Engineering and Computer Science but MUST have the written consent of the Graduate Program Director.
     
    Capstone Requirement
    Oral Comprehensive Exam (administered as part of MECE 6190 Engineering Seminar Course) Written Comprehensive Exam (students MUST successfully pass a written exam in each one of the four required (core) courses with a grade of >70%.
     
    Total graduate hours for degree: 36
     

    Course Descriptions

    MECE 6190: Engineering Seminar               [1‐0]

    This one hour seminar course is geared toward helping graduate students develop and improve their oral presentation skills and provide them with technical expertise in their field of study. The class will feature engineering presentations prepared by faculty and graduate students from various engineering disciplines and backgrounds. Students enrolled in this class will gain great oral presentation experience by presenting their work in front of an audience and by learning from other featured speakers. The experience gained from this seminar course will prove invaluable for students in their future careers.

    Prerequisite: Graduate standing in engineering.

    MECE 6310: Intermediate Engineering Analysis              [3‐0]

    Topics include vector algebra, coordinate systems, vector differential calculus, vector integral calculus, tensor analysis and applications, calculus of variations, and variational analysis.

    Prerequisite: Graduate standing in engineering.

    MECE 6316: Advanced Materials Engineering              [3‐0]

    Course provides an overview, at the graduate level, of the broad area of materials engineering. Major topics include analytical and spectroscopic techniques of use to the engineer and kinetics of nucleation and growth as applied to polymers, metals, and ceramics. The physics and applications of electronic, thermal,and optical properties of materials are explored and tools and techniques for phase diagrams of binary, ternary, and quaternary systems are covered.

    Prerequisite: Graduate standing in engineering.

    MECE 6317: Corrosion Engineering              [3‐0]

    The corrosion phenomena are complex due to the coexistence of electrochemical, metallurgical, biological and environmental parameters which can act at the surfaces. The Corrosion Engineering course will provide an understanding of the mechanisms of corrosion, characterization of the process, protection by coatings and lifetime prediction. The fundamentals of thermodynamics and kinetic concepts will be used to describe destructive chemical interactions of materials with their environment. Particular emphasis will be placed on the identification and solution of practical corrosion problems in real engineering situations.

    Prerequisite: Graduate standing in engineering.

    MECE 6318: Intermediate Biomaterials               [3‐0]

    In-depth study of specific areas in mechanical engineering. Subject matter varies from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit when subject matter changes.

    Prerequisite: Graduate standing in engineering.

    MECE 6319: Thin Films Surface Engineering              [3‐0]

    Techniques and processes of thin film deposition and surface treatment; Vacuum science and technology; Fundamental processes occurring during thin film deposition (adsorption, surface diffusion, nucleation, and microstructure development); major thin film deposition processes: evaporation, sputtering, chemical and the coating systems; Testing, characterization and applications of novel thin films (precision mechanical engineering, electronic devices, aerospace industries).

    Prerequisite: Graduate standing in engineering.

    MECE 6320: Fracture Mechanics              [3‐0]

    Development of the tools of linear and nonlinear fracture mechanics with coverage of theoretical considerations. The primary focus of the course is applications of tools to solution of practical problems in fracture prediction and failure analysis. Significant attention is paid to the phenomenology of fracture in metals, polymers, ceramics and composites.

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing in engineering.

    MECE 6321: Intermediate Composite Material Design               [3‐0]

    An introduction to the theory of mechanics of solids for elastic and viscoelastic composite materials. Emphasis on analysis and design of structural laminate composite including failure mechanism, e.g., fatigue, delamination and dynamics of composites including effective moduli and material damping.

    Prerequisite: Graduate standing in engineering.

    MECE 6322: Ceramic Materials Engineering              [3‐0]

    A survey of the fundamental properties of ceramic and glass materials which are utilized in electronic, electro-optic, thermal and mechanical systems. Includes an introduction to the manufacturing processes specific to ceramics with an emphasis on their interaction with the design process. Probabilistic design schemes for mechanical components are covered and students perform a detailed component or process design. Several laboratory demonstrations and assignments are included.

    Prerequisite: Graduate standing in engineering.

    MECE 6323: Polymer Processing              [3‐0]

    Course designed to provide fundamental understanding of polymer processing techniques. The course presents information that relates the thermo-physical, mechanical and rheological properties of polymeric materials with particular processing techniques. Manufacturing polymer processes such as mixing, extrusion, injection molding, calendaring, fiber spinning and processes related to nanoreinforced polymer fabrication are studied.

    Prerequisite: Graduate standing in engineering.

    MECE 6324: Viscoelasticity Theory              [3‐0]

    Introduction to the mathematical theory of linear viscoelasticity with a focus on solution of real problems. Coverage of transform techniques, numerical models, design of viscoelastic components and experimental determination of viscoelastic constitutive relations.

    Prerequisite: Graduate standing in engineering.

    MECE 6325: Composite Structures Engineering              [3‐0]

    The course is devoted to the theory and/or analysis of composite materials (i.e. composite laminates) and structures in particular. The principles and method for the analysis and design of structural components, from micromechanics through macromechanics to structural analysis, are presented along with the discussion of how these theories may be used in practical design problems.

    Prerequisite: Graduate standing in engineering.

    MECE 6326: Polymer Engineering              [3‐0]

    Introductory course designed to provide a polymer materials science background to engineering students that will enable them to design polymer components.

    Prerequisite: Graduate standing in engineering.

    MECE 6327: Intermediate Nanotechnology              [3‐0]

    Course designed to introduce fundamental nanotechnology and nanoscience aspects as well as to study a variety of technologies and potential applications that fall under the nanotech umbrella. The nanotechnology revolution provides an opportunity for the students to foster creative thinking given the vast potential in the area.

    Prerequisite: Graduate standing in engineering.

    MECE 6328: Spectroscopic Techniques               [3‐0]

    Course designed to introduce students to spectroscopic techniques used in the identification of organic compounds. Techniques such as mass spectrometry, infrared, wave dispersive spectrometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and elemental dispersive spectroscopy will be studied. Students will have an opportunity to get practical experience in operating some of the studied techniques.

    Prerequisite: Graduate standing in engineering..

    MECE 6331: Intermediate Dynamics of Mechanical Systems              [3‐0]

    Intermediate dynamics, including Newton- Euler, Lagrange, and Hamilton’s principles; gyroscopic effects in mechanical systems; analysis of stability of systems; numerical simulation.

    Prerequisite: Graduate standing in engineering.

    MECE 6332: Intermediate Mechanical Vibrations              [3‐0]

    An examination of linear, multi-degree of freedom and continuous vibratory systems, both conservative and non-conservative. Free and forced vibration problems using generalized coordinates are also examined.

    Prerequisite: Graduate standing in engineering.

    MECE 6333: Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos              [3‐0]

    This course covers the essentials of nonlinear dynamics and chaos in mechanical engineering. Topics include: Principles of dynamics, principle of virtual work, Hamilton principle, Lagrange equations, continuous systems applications. Nonlinear models and nonlinear phenomena. One-degree-of-freedom systems, qualitative analysis, equilibrium, stability, limit cycles, bifurcation, chaos, strange attractors and fractals; quantitative analysis, approximate asymptotic techniques; conservative systems, nonconservative systems, forced systems, subharmonic and superharmonic resonances, parametrically excited systems. Finite-degree- of-freedom systems, free oscillations of gyroscopic systems, forced oscillations of quadratic or cubic nonlinear systems, parametrically excited systems. Nonlinear continuous systems, beams, strings, plates. Experimental nonlinear dynamics and chaotic vibrations. Utilization of MATLAB in mechanical engineering applications related to nonlinear dynamics and chaos.

    Prerequisite: Graduate standing in engineering.

    MECE 6334: Modeling MEMS and NEMS              [3‐0]

    This course covers modeling and analysis of microelectromechanical and nanoelectromechanical systems. Topics include: introduction; continuum mechanics: hear conduction, elasticity, linear thermo elasticity, fluid dynamics, electromagnetism, numerical methods; scaling; thermally driven systems; modeling elastic structures; beans, membranes, plates; modeling coupled thermal-elastic systems; modeling electrostatic-elastic systems: membranes, beams, plates; modeling magnetically actuated systems: micro fluidics; and nonlinear dynamics of MEMS and NEMS.

    Prerequisite: Graduate standing in engineering.

    MECE 6335: Orthopedic Biomechanics               [3‐0]

    This course covers the following topics: loads and motion in the musculoskeletal system; tissue mechanics; structural analysis; bone- implant systems; total hip replacements; total knee replacements; articulating surfaces; introduction to and utilization of computational packages in orthopedic biomechanics; computer aided design of implants; and finite element analysis.

    Prerequisite: Graduate standing in engineering.

    MECE 6341: Modeling of Physical Systems              [3‐0]

    This course reviews principles that govern the behavior of dynamic systems and introduces lumped-parameter methods for building mathematical models and simulations of engineering systems. An energetic approach based on bond graph techniques, invented in 1959 by Henry M. Paytner, is introduced and used to model, simulate and analyze mechanical, electrical, magnetic electromechanical, hydraulic and thermal systems. Advanced topics include nonlinear mechanics, Lagrange’s Equations and distributed-parameter systems.

    Prerequisite: Graduate standing in engineering.

    MECE 6342: Modern Control Systems              [3‐0]

    This course is an introduction to state variable methods for design and analysis of control systems. Concepts including controllability, observability, calculus of variations, linear quadratic regulator, optimal control, Lyapunov stability criteria and Pontryagin’s Minimum Principle are covered for discrete- and continuous-time systems.

    Prerequisites: MECE 6341 or equivalent and graduate standing in engineering.

    MECE 6343: Digital Control Systems              [3‐0]

    This course presents the theory of digital control systems required to design, simulate and implement a control strategy using computers and discrete data manipulation. The development of microprocessors, microcontrollers and digital signal processors allow taking sampled data measurements of the system output and compute a feedback control signal to make decisions and generate a desired system performance. Digital control systems are highly flexible, can implement complex control strategies and are easily reprogrammable. Analysis and design tools will be studied for the design of digital controllers. MATLAB/Simulink will be used to design and simulate the digital controllers.

    Prerequisites: MECE 6341 or equivalent and graduate standing in engineering.

    MECE 6344: Nonlinear Control Systems               [3‐0]

    This course is meant to be an introduction to advanced nonlinear control methods including variable structure systems, feedback linearization and sliding mode control. It covers methods of stability analysis and controller design of nonlinear controls. The course will review such topics as phase-plane analysis and Lyapunov Stability Criteria and advanced topics including adaptive control methods.

    Prerequisites: MECE 6341 or equivalent and graduate standing in engineering.

    MECE 6360: Advanced Mechanics of Materials              [3‐0]

    The topics covered in this course include: theory of elasticity, principles of stress and strain, inelastic material behavior, applications of energy methods, bending and torsion of general cross‐sections, curved beams, elastic and inelastic stability of columns and flat plates.

    Prerequisite: Graduate standing in engineering.

    MECE 6362: Finite Element Analysis              [3‐0]

    An introduction to the theory of finite element methods, with application to stress analysis, natural frequency extraction and heat transfer. Strategies for meshing and applying boundary conditions are also examined. Existing codes are used for determining finite element solutions.

    Prerequisite: Graduate standing in engineering.

    MECE 6372: Viscous Flow I              [3‐0]

    Course is aimed towards familiarizing the student with the properties of a fluid, viscous flow phenomena and the fundamental equations of compressible viscous flow, such as the conservation of mass and momentum equations and the energy equation. Solutions to some of the most common Newtonian viscous flow equations, such as the Couette and Poiseuille flows and some unsteady duct flows will also be explored. Laminar boundary layers will be studied in detail.

    Prerequisite: Graduate standing in engineering.

    MECE 6373: Viscous Flow II              [3‐0]

    This course is a continuation of MECE 6372 Viscous Flow I. Coverage begins with a detailed study of laminar boundary layers, a select few boundary‐layer solutions and two finite‐ difference approaches will be presented. Stability theory and the latest engineering predictions of laminar to turbulent transition will be examined. Incompressible turbulent mean flow and turbulence modeling will be explored.

    Prerequisite: MECE 6372 or equivalent and graduate standing in engineering.

    MECE 6375: Engineering Acoustics              [3‐0]

    Course is designed to develop an understanding of the fundamentals of acoustics, such as traveling waves in one‐ and two‐dimensions, the derivation and nature of the fundamental fluid acoustic equations, the phenomena associated with reflection, transmission, radiation, reception, absorption and attenuation of sound, and the phenomena associated with cavities and waveguides, including sound propagation in pipes, resonators and filters.

    Prerequisite: Graduate standing in engineering.

    MECE 6379: Gas Dynamics              [3‐0]

    This course is designed to provide a fundamental understanding and a cohesive picture of compressible flow from a modern perspective which is supportive mixture of classical analysis along with computational techniques. This course covers the basics of one‐dimensional compressible flow, integral forms of conservation equations for inviscid flow, shocks and expansion waves, unsteady wave motion and linearized flow.

    Prerequisite: Graduate standing in engineering.

    MECE 6380: Combustion Engineering              [3‐0]

    The topics covered in this course include: role of combustion in energy, environment and fire problems, thermodynamics of combustion (thermochemistry), fuels (gas, liquid, solid), chemical kinetics, combustion of gaseous and vaporized fuels (flames), combustion of liquid fuels, combustion of solid fuels, pollutant emissions, and modern measurements.

    Prerequisite: Graduate standing in engineering.

    MECE 6384: HVAC System Design              [3‐0]

    Heating, ventilating, air conditioning and refrigeration is a specific application of the principles of thermodynamics, heat transfer and fluid mechanics to the design and analysis of systems that maintain the environmental conditions of controlled space. An emphasis is placed on the practical application of principles to design and analysis of HVAC systems in building and the use of HVAC software.

    Prerequisite: Graduate standing in engineering.

    MECE 6385: Thermal Systems              [3‐0]

    Modeling and simulating the steady‐state and dynamic thermal behavior of components and systems; advanced modeling of properties; and optimization applied to the design of thermal systems.

    Prerequisite: Graduate standing in engineering.

    MECE 6399: Topics in Mechanical Engineering              [3‐0]

    In‐depth study of specific areas in mechanical engineering. Subject matter varies from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit when subject matter changes.

    Prerequisite: Graduate standing in engineering.

    MECE 7300: Thesis I              [3‐0]

    Preparation of a thesis to fulfill the requirement for the master’s degree under the thesis option. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on a letter‐ grade basis only.

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing in mechanical engineering and consent of the graduate advisor.

    MECE 7301: Thesis II              [3‐0]

    Preparation of a thesis to fulfill the requirement for the master’s degree under the thesis option. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on a letter‐ grade basis only.

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing in mechanical engineering and consent of the graduate advisor.