Anthropology (MAIS)

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The  Master  of  Arts  in  Interdisciplinary  Studies  (MAIS) in Anthropology program enables students to obtain broad- based knowledge in three different fields at the masters level. Concentration in anthropology provides a solid base of anthropological concepts using a holistic approach, critical thinking skills, and varied research methodologies.
 
To pursue an MAIS degree with a concentration in anthropology, a student must take 36 masters (6000 and 7000) level courses.  Eighteen of those hours must be in anthropology, including ANTH 6345 Anthropological Theory and Methodology. A few other graduate level options in anthropology include:    Mexican American Folklore, Anthropology of Borders, Mexican American Culture, Visual Anthropology and Ethnography of the Borderlands. The remaining 18 hours must be taken in two different disciplines, 9 hours in each discipline.  The MAIS degree includes both a thesis and non-thesis option.
  • Why UTRGV?

    • Ranked #79 among 300+ national universities by Washington Monthly in 2018
    • Accredited, cutting edge degree program
    • Experienced, dedicated faculty
    • Affordable tuition (ranked #1 in net price among natinal universities by Washington Monthly in 2018 and #3 most affordable university in America 2018 by BestValueSchools.com)
    • Demonstrated student success in research, professional certification and career advancement
  • Admission Requirements

    Step #1: Submit a UTRGV Graduate Application at www.utrgv.edu/gradapply. The university application fee of $50 ($100 for International Applicants) can be paid online by credit card or electronic check (in the online application). All application fees are nonrefundable.

    Step #2: Request your official transcripts to be sent electronically to gradapps@utrgv.edu or mailed to:

    The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley
    The Graduate College
    Marialice Shary Shivers Bldg. 1.158
    1201 W. University Drive
    Edinburg, TX 78539-2999

     
    *Please Note: If you are a graduate of UTPA, UTB/TSC, or UTRGV you do not need to request an official transcript to be sent to the Graduate College.
     

    Review and submit all Program Requirements:

    • Undergraduate GPA of at least 3.0.If applicant does not meet the minimum undergraduate GPA criterion, a GRE general test is required for conditional admission.
    • Official transcripts from each institution attended (must be submitted directly to UTRGV).
    • Submission of a statement of purpose and goals for pursuing the degree
    • Submission of a resume
    • Two letters of recommendation, at least one of them from an academic source.

    Additional requirements for domestic applicants who attended foreign universities:

    • TOEFL or IELTS Language Proficiency Test with minimum scores: 550 on paper-based, 213 on computer based, or 79 on Internet-based for the TOEFL; 6.5 for the IELTS. TOEFL and IELTS scores are valid for 2 years. For additional information, visit the Additional Documents for Domestic Applicants who Attend Foreign Universities section of our website.
    • Certified English translation of educational records.

    Additional requirements for international applicants:

    • TOEFL or IELTS Language Proficiency Test with minimum scores: 550 on paper-based, 213 on computer based, or 79 on Internet-based for the TOEFL; 6.5 for the IELTS. For additional information, visit the English Proficiency Exam section of our website.
    • Certified English translation of educational records.
    • Financial   Documentation  showing sufficient funds to cover all expenses (living and academic) for the first year of study. For additional information, visit the Financial Documentation section of our website.
    • Immigration  documents, including a current copy of your valid passport. For additional information, visit the Immigration Documents section of our website.

    UPDATE ON INTERNATIONAL ADMISSIONS FROM U.S. IMMIGRATION AND CUSTOMS ENFORCEMENT:

    • SEVP regulations prohibit the issuance of a Form I-20 based on conditional admission, effective July 13, 2016. University officials can only issue a Form I-20 when students have met all standards for admission for the program of study listed on the Form I-20. These standards for admission include any English proficiency requirements.

  • Program Contact

    Program Coordinator: Dr. Margaret Graham

    Phone: (956) 665-7393

    Office: Edinburg Campus, LABN 329

    E-Mail: Margaret.graham@utrgv.edu

  • Deadlines

    Deadlines:

    Applications will be accepted year round and prospective students are encouraged to apply at least 2 months before classes start to ensure a timely application review.  Applying early will also give prospective students the best opportunity to be considered for scholarships and other possible funding opportunities.

    *Note: This program only admits applicants during Fall and Spring semesters.

  • Course Requirements

     
    Required Courses 3
    ANTH 6345: Anthropological Method and Theory 3
     
    Choose one of the following options:
     
    Thesis Option:
    Anthropology Courses 9
    Chosen from the following:
    ANTH 6304: Indians of North America 3
    ANTH 6305: Great Discoveries in Archaeology 3
    ANTH 6306: Anthropology of Borders 3
    ANTH 6307: Shipwrecks, Pirates and the Sea: An Introduction to Maritime Archaeology and History 3
    ANTH 6308: Conquistadors and Indian Chiefs of the Borderlands: A Comparative Colonialism of Northern New Spain 3
    ANTH 6310: Food and Culture 3
    ANTH 6311: Medical Anthropology 3
    ANTH 6312: Political and Legal Anthropology 3
    ANTH 6314: Environmental Anthropology 3
    ANTH 6315: Discovering the Rio Grande Valley 3
    ANTH 6317: Field Experience of the Borderlands 3
    ANTH 6323: Mexican American Culture 3
    ANTH 6333: U.S. and Other World Cultures 3
    ANTH 6337: Foundations of Ethnomusicology/ Anthropology of Music 3
    ANTH 6338: Music Ethnography and Fieldwork Methods 3
    ANTH 6348: Peoples and Cultures of Mexico 3
    ANTH 6350: Mexican American Folk Medicine 3
    ANTH 6355: Psychology and Mythology 3
    ANTH 6363: Archaeological Method and Theory 3
    ANTH 6365: Archaeology of South America 3
    ANTH 6369: Archaeology of Mexico and Central America 3
    ANTH 6373: Archaeology of Ancient Egypt 3
    ANTH 6374: Archaeology of North America 3
    ANTH 6375: Mexican American Folklore 3
    ANTH 6380: Social Anthropology 3
    ANTH 6385: Topics in Anthropology 3
    ANTH 6390: Directed Studies 3
     
    Free Electives from a second discipline 9
     
    Free Electives from a third discipline 9
     
    Capstone Requirement 6
    ANTH 7300: Thesis I 3
    ANTH 7301: Thesis II 3
     
    Total graduate hours for degree: 36
     
    Non-Thesis Option:
    Anthropology Courses 15
    Chosen from the following:
    ANTH 6304: Indians of North America 3
    ANTH 6305: Great Discoveries in Archaeology 3
    ANTH 6306: Anthropology of Borders 3
    ANTH 6307: Shipwrecks, Pirates and the Sea: An Introduction to Maritime Archaeology and History 3
    ANTH 6308: Conquistadors and Indian Chiefs of the Borderlands: A Comparative Colonialism of Northern New Spain 3
    ANTH 6310: Food and Culture 3
    ANTH 6311: Medical Anthropology 3
    ANTH 6312: Political and Legal Anthropology 3
    ANTH 6314: Environmental Anthropology 3
    ANTH 6315: Discovering the Rio Grande Valley 3
    ANTH 6317: Field Experience of the Borderlands 3
    ANTH 6323: Mexican American Culture 3
    ANTH 6333: U.S. and Other World Cultures 3
    ANTH 6337: Foundations of Ethnomusicology/ Anthropology of Music 3
    ANTH 6338: Music Ethnography and Fieldwork Methods 3
    ANTH 6348: Peoples and Cultures of Mexico 3
    ANTH 6350: Mexican American Folk Medicine 3
    ANTH 6355: Psychology and Mythology 3
    ANTH 6363: Archaeological Method and Theory 3
    ANTH 6365: Archaeology of South America 3
    ANTH 6369: Archaeology of Mexico and Central America 3
    ANTH 6373: Archaeology of Ancient Egypt 3
    ANTH 6374: Archaeology of North America 3
    ANTH 6375: Mexican American Folklore 3
    ANTH 6380: Social Anthropology 3
    ANTH 6385: Topics in Anthropology 3
    ANTH 6390: Directed Studies 3
     
    Free Electives from a second discipline 9
     
    Free Electives from a third discipline 9
     
    Capstone Requirement
    Completion of Research Paper from ANTH 6345
     
    Total graduate hours for degree: 36
     

    Course Descriptions

    ANTH 6304: Indians of North America               [3‐0]

    To explore the diverse nature of Native American cultures at the time of European contact. In this class students will see how ethnographers, ethnohistorians, and historians have recorded the lifeways of contemporary aboriginal societies and have reconstructed their prehistoric past. Consideration will be given to the impact of European contact and how that has altered “Western” images of the North American Indian. Women and men will be equally considered In order to give a balanced view of the richness of these cultures.

    ANTH 6305: Great Discoveries in Archaeology              [3‐0]

    This course examines many of the most famous archaeological discoveries of the past century that have shed light on humans and their culture, human origins, world history and the development of human behavior. “Popular” assumptions about these finds will be evaluated in light of current anthropological theories and within the historical context of the era in which they were found in order to discern a more accurate knowledge of the past.

    ANTH 6306: Anthropology of Borders              [3‐0]

    Anthropology of Borders takes border zones and issues crucial to understanding them both as its field site and point of comparative analysis. From Spanish‐French Catalonia to the borderlands of Indonesia, this course investigates issues commonplace to zones of contact such as linguistic variation and innovation as well as the role of the state in construction and codifying notions of citizenship. By looking at borders from a comparative ethnographic perspective the course seeks to contextualize issues faced by borderlanders of South Texas within a global framework.

    ANTH 6307: Shipwrecks, Pirates and the Sea: An Introduction to Maritime Archaeology and History              [3‐0]

    Maritime archaeology is a profession combining traditional fields and extensive experience. Anthropology, history, archaeology, geography and related sciences provide the theoretical and practical methodology with which maritime sites are found, tested and interpreted. This course is designed to provide students with the field’s background, range and relevant examples involving both history and archaeology.

    ANTH 6308: Conquistadors and Indian Chiefs of the Borderlands: A Comparative Colonialism of Northern New Spain              [3‐0]

    This course covers Spanish and Native American interactions in what Is today the Southeastern United States, Texas and California. Emphasis will be placed on how the social and natural environment was changes in these areas. Examination of these changes will be done through the documentary and archaeological records,

    ANTH 6310: Food and Culture              [3‐0]

    This course examines the interaction between human culture and food from an anthropological perspective. It examines the social roles of food and how economic forces are transforming food systems in the world today.

    ANTH 6311: Medical Anthropology              [3‐0]

    This course introduces students to the diverse filed of medical anthropology. It examines the human experiences of health and diseases in cross‐cultural, historical, and evolutionary perspectives.

    ANTH 6312: Political and Legal Anthropology               [3‐0]

    This course involves the anthropological analysis of political and legal institutions as revealed in relevant theoretical debates and with reference to ethnographic examples. Topics included in this course are the development of political and legal anthropology and their key concepts; studies of the state; kingship; and other forms of authority; forms of knowledge and power; political competition and conflict; indigenous responses to colonialism; civil society and citizenship; nationalism, ethnicity, and genocide; theories of order and normative domain; law as command and law as rules; the legal dimensions of hierarchy and authority; dispute institutions and processes; legal pluralism; Indian Islamic and other non‐Western legal systems.

    ANTH 6314: Environmental Anthropology              [3‐0]

    An introduction to human/environmental interactions from various anthropological perspectives. History of anthropological approaches to the environment, emphasizing the mutual interconnectedness of people and nature. Survey of evolutionary models, cultural ecology, systems approaches, indigenous knowledge, ethno ecology, nature and the state, political ecology, eco‐feminism, environmentalism, and environmental justice.

    ANTH 6315: Discovering the Rio Grande Valley               [3‐0]

    This course will be taught by a team of faculty from Anthropology, History, Geology, and Biology who will cover in‐depth content of the Rio Grande Valley from various disciplinary points of view. This class is part of the CHAPS (Community Historic Archeology Project with the Schools) program that focuses on primary field research. Students will examine land titles/abstracts, study the geology of the region, conduct oral histories, and research the flora and fauna of this area. The course can be repeated once for credit.


    ANTH 6317: Field Experience of the Borderlands                [3‐0]

    This course provides students an opportunity to design and conduct an independent research project in the Rio Grande Valley. Instruction focuses on field methods, ethics, and technology. Students learn to use the latest software and digital audio and video recording technology. Ultimately, students will deposit their primary source material in the Border Studies Archive.

    ANTH 6323: Mexican American Culture               [3‐0]

    An introduction to the culture and traditions of Mexican Americans. The cultural history, organization of the family, traditions, lifestyle, kinship patterns, values, social organization of Mexican American culture will be examined using appropriate methodologies and theoretical perspectives set within a multicultural context.

    ANTH 6333: U.S. and Other World Cultures               [3‐0]

    This course is concerned with the many aspects of human culture including traditions, customs, folkways and religious beliefs ó on local, national and worldwide levels. It explores topics ranging from roles and responsibilities in the family unit to the interaction of different cultures with their social and physical environments. As the course assesses important contributions of various past and present cultures, considerable emphasis is placed on similarities and differences between the United States and other world cultures.

    ANTH 6337: Foundations of Ethnomusicology/Anthropology of Music              [3‐0]

    This course introduces students to Interdisciplinary perspectives in the field of ethnomusicology providing an enriched understanding of the role of music in human life. A wide range of musical traditions and perspectives are explored as well as social and cultural contexts, functions, meanings of ‐‐and ideas about‐‐music, and its local/global impact.

    ANTH 6338: Music Ethnography and Fieldwork Methods              [3‐0]

    This course introduces students to a variety of musical case studies drawn from the fields of ethnomusicology, folklore, anthropology and sociology. They will analyze research methodologies, approaches to fieldwork, issues and ideas, and analytical methods locally and globally. They will conduct fieldwork and write an ethnography.

    ANTH 6345: Anthropological Method and Theory              [3‐0]

    This is the capstone course for the graduate degree in anthropology that involves the completion of a capstone term paper on a subject concerning anthropological theory. Topics in this course include instruction in the methodology (interviewing, participant observation, network analysis, etc.) and theoretical perspectives of anthropology.

    ANTH 6348: Peoples and Cultures of Mexico              [3‐0]

    This course is an introduction to the diverse peoples and cultures of Mexico and Central America. The traditions, beliefs and practices of different cultures will be examined through an emphasis on the ethnography and ethno history of indigenous cultures of the region.

    ANTH 6350: Mexican American Folk Medicine              [3‐0]

    A study of popular medical traditions found among Mexicans and Mexican Americans. Influences from European and Native American sources will be identified and ongoing changes in the folk medical landscape will be examined.

    ANTH 6355: Psychology and Mythology               [3‐0]

    This course will study the impact and interrelationships of psychological thought and mythological theory. The impact of the theories of Freud, Adler, Jung, Levi‐Strauss and others on mythology will be studied.

    ANTH 6363: Archaeological Method and Theory              [3‐0]

    Reviews major theoretical orientations from an historical perspective with an emphasis on current approaches. Examines major aspects of archaeological methodology including excavations and laboratory procedures, sampling strategy, dating techniques and floral and faunal analysis.

    ANTH 6365: Archaeology of South America               [3‐0]

    A study of the prehistory of South America, with an emphasis on the Andean area. Cultural development will be traced from the time of the first inhabitants through the Incas. The development of complex societies leading up to the Incas will be emphasized.

    ANTH 6369: Archaeology of Mexico and Central America               [3‐0]

    A study of the prehistory of Mexico and Central America beginning with the first cultures to inhabit the area and ending with the arrival of the Spanish. Major civilizations of the area will be emphasized, including the Olmecs, Mayas and Aztecs.

    ANTH 6373: Archaeology of Ancient Egypt              [3‐0]

    A study of the prehistory and history of ancient Egypt from the time of the first inhabitants in the area to the arrival of the Romans. Emphasis will be placed on the architectural and artistic achievements of Egypt during the time of the pharaohs. Aspects of ancient Egyptian social classes and religious beliefs and practices will also be explored.

    ANTH 6374: Archaeology of North America              [3‐0]

    A study of the prehistory of North America north of Mexico. The course deals with cultural development from the time of the initial peopling of the New World until the arrival of Columbus. Major cultural developments in the southwestern and eastern United States will be emphasized.

    ANTH 6375: Mexican American Folklore              [3‐0]

    This course is an in‐depth study of Mexican‐ American folklore. The course includes the study of Chicano legends, folk tales, riddles, folk music, ballads and festivals. Students have the opportunity to collect and archive folklore materials.

    ANTH 6380: Social Anthropology              [3‐0]

    A cross cultural review of kinship, economic and political organization. The course will review rules of marriage, descent groups, reciprocity, bands, tribes and chiefdoms among other topics.

    ANTH 6385: Topics in Anthropology              [3‐0]

    Topics are varied according to availability of faculty and student interest. Course can be repeated as topics change.

    ANTH 6390: Directed Studies              [3‐0]

    A study of selected topics in Anthropology. Topics are varied according to availability of faculty and student interest. Course can be repeated for credit as topics change.

    ANTH 7300: Thesis I              [3‐0]

    Research and writing of the thesis. Prerequisite: ANTH 7300

    ANTH 7301: Thesis II              [3‐0]

    Research and writing of the thesis.

    ANTH 7600: Thesis              [6‐0]

    Research and writing of the thesis.

    ANTH 7601: Thesis              [6‐0]

    Research and writing of the thesis.