BFA in Studio Art - Ceramics

At the UTRGV ceramics department students explore different styles of hand building, throwing and casting, to create and explore visual art. It is a well- equipped department with a large number of kilns and potters wheels. There is a stocked glaze lab were students can develop and create high fire, low fire and raku glazes. Undergraduates and graduate students can elect sculpture or ceramics as a concentration of their B.F.A. studio art or M.F.A. degrees. Come and put your own twist on tradition.

ceramics

Degree Plan


Our area is located on the Edinburg campus at the northeast end of the College of Art, where the ceramic studio occupies over 5300 Square feet.

All students (undergraduate and graduate) have access to our fully equipped facility, which includes:

  • Twenty potter’s wheels
  • Chemical storage with fully stacked materials
  • A specific area dedicated to Pit firing
  • Two digital scales and six triple-beam scale for glaze formulation
  • Soldner professional clay mixer
  • Two large slab rollers
  • Bailey MXP double auger pug mill
  • Glaze spraying booth
  • Outdoor clay mixing area
  • Three large Electric Skutt Kilns
  • One electric test kiln
  • Olympic natural gas Raku kiln
  • Two 40 cu. ft. Geil computer control kilns
  • One large gas kiln
  • Large screen and projection camera for classroom instruction
  • Adequate shelving for each level of ceramics course work
  • Space for experimental kiln building

Ceramics


Class Descriptions

Ceramics 1

This course is focused on the fundamentals of ceramics and the basic methods of ceramic production: hand building, wheel throwing, surface decoration, and glaze application. It also involves technique, creativity, and problem-solving methods, as well as demonstrations, group critiques, discussions, PowerPoint lectures and student participation in studio activities in order to provide a working knowledge of the ceramic medium.

Ceramics 2

This course is designed to enhance the skills learned in the Ceramics I class. Various methods of ceramic production will be practiced through different projects such as hand building, wheel throwing, surface decoration, and glaze application and basic mold making techniques. It also involves technical, creative, and problem-solving methods, as well as demonstrations, group critiques, discussions, PowerPoint lectures and student participation in studio activities in order to provide a working knowledge of the ceramic medium.

Ceramics 3

This class is to support and assist the students in the refinement of their skills at an intermediate level of experimentation , as well as the development of concept and aesthetics. Through assigned readings, writing, visual and oral presentations, discussions and group critiques students will become familiar with historical and contemporary trends in ceramic production and learn to apply them to their own art projects.

Ceramics 4

This course is a self-directed advanced studio practice intended to support students in their personal studio career or continued education in ceramics. Students are expected to participate in a critical forum that analyzes their own work and that of other artists. Through assigned readings, writing, visual and oral presentations, discussions and group critiques students will evaluate current trends in ceramics and ceramic technology along with historical and cultural concepts and aesthetics. The class also requires students to practice professional skills within the ceramic discipline, such as supervising and managing the ceramic studio, developing a resume, an artist’s statement and bio, the digital documentation of their works, and the development of a personal website. In addition the student will have responsibilities in the classroom as a peer tutor and will be asked to advise beginning students.